I wandered into the library accidentally yesterday, and I am so glad I did.  During my childhood, I looked forward to library trips like a teeny-bopper looks forward to going to the mall; however, my library days have petered out in the last few years.  I guess I just forgot about that hallowed book haven.  I was happily reminded yesterday  of how many thousands of books, CDs, and magazines I have access to without paying a dime (that is, unless you are prone to incurring late fees like me); a pleasant thought in the money-driven consumeristic culture I live in.  No, I don’t have to buy it, I can borrow it.  I casually browsed the aisles of the library, letting myself stop and leaf through any book that caught my eye for a while.  Among the books in the pile that I hugged against my chest as I approached the checkout counter were books on gardening, interior decorating, and vegetarian cuisine.

I was happily reminded yesterday  of how many thousands of books, CDs, and magazines I have access to without paying a dime.

Ross and I have been watching a documentary that is free on YouTube called The Corporation recommended to us by Chris Haw, a recent speaker at the Peace-by-Peace conference hosted in Searcy and a co-author of Jesus for President.  This documentary reveals the powerful hold that the corporate world has on the global economy.  Instead of being ruled by kings or the church, as in ages past, this age is ruled by the fairly recent phenomenon of the corporation.  The documentary reveals the corporation as a money-making machine that although legally is classified as a person, actually has no soul or conscience with profit building in its DNA.  The documentary is made up of several small segments (24) that you download and watch serially.  We have been viewing a few chapters a night, and sometimes after watching, I feel the same way I might feel after watching a horror flick.  I don’t know what I think about the documentary yet, and I’m looking for more sources to learn from about the subjects of capitalism and the corporation; however, one thing can be deduced through sheer observation, the corporate world rules.

Sometimes after watching, I feel the same way I might feel after watching a horror flick.

The library was a peaceful place of refuge from the onslaught of corporate media images (i.e. commercials, adds, billboards, signs, logos, brands) that were stuffed down my throat that day.  When I ducked into the library, I was reminded that some things in the human experience are are too valuable to be sold and should be reserved for the public good like parks and libraries.  Some people want to battle capitalism with capitalism by creating a market for clean air (companies must buy a certain number of clean-air credits for every pound of air pollution they create).  Even seeds and genes are now patented for profit.  In the modern world, a commodity is made out of everything.  All things modern are digitized and packaged into discrete categories.  However, the world was not made this way.  Even children can observe that all things on Earth are relationally connected.

Some things in the human experience are are too valuable to be sold and should be reserved for the public good.

The library was a project started for the good of people and not to make a profit.  Varied worlds are open to the old and young and to all classes of Americans with access to the public books: ceramics making, wood working, wreath making, exercising, cooking the food of Lebanon, gardening flowers, gardening vegetables, art museum hopping, traveling to China, raising children, cutting hair, learning Civil War history, and more.  Tonight, I will figuratively toast the public good as I page through a richly illustrated book called Rooms and enjoy a piece of hot biscotti.

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